Nienke van der Marel

Assistant Professor at Leiden Observatory


Email
nmarel@strw.leidenuniv.nl
/images/1021/original/

Nienke van der Marel

Nienke van der Marel is an Assistant Professor at Leiden Observatory (the Netherlands). Her research focuses on planet formation in protoplanetary disks. Before the current position at Leiden Observatory Nienke was a Banting research fellow at University of Victoria (Canada, BC), an NRC research fellow at the NRC Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics (Canada, BC) and a Beatrice Watson Parrent Fellow at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu (USA, HI).

Nienke van der Marel works with submillimeter interferometry data, primarily from ALMA. She analyzes both molecular line and continuum data through physical-chemical modeling with e.g. RADMC-3D and DALI and compare observational data with theoretical models and exoplanet studies. For more details on her research activities, check her research page.

Leiden Observatory - About us

Leiden Observatory is the astronomical institute of the Faculty of Science of Leiden University.

It was established in 1633, and is the oldest university observatory in operation today, with a very rich tradition. Leiden Observatory carries out world class research in the formation of structures in the universe and the origin and evolution of galaxies, the detection and characterization of exoplanets, and the formation of stars and planetary systems. The institute consists of about 35 faculty and adjunct faculty, 60 postdoctoral researchers, 100 MSc and 100 PhD students, and 30 support staff. We offer an excellent educational programme at the Bachelor’s and Master’s levels and a renowned PhD programme. Within the Faculty of Science, the institute closely collaborates with the Leiden Institute of Physics, the Mathematical Institute and the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science.

Leiden is part of NOVA, the Netherlands Research School of Astronomy, which coordinates and stimulates astronomical research at the four university astronomy institutes at Amsterdam, Groningen, Leiden and Nijmegen.

World Class

Our ambitious research programme focuses on observations using the world’s most powerful ground-based and space telescopes, on theoretical astrophysical and astrochemical modeling, on large scale simulations, and on laboratory experiments that mimic space conditions. Our world-class astronomical research is supported by the development of key technologies for ground-breaking astronomical discoveries and translates into an excellent educational programme at the Bachelor’s and Master’s levels. Our PhD programme delivers scientists that that find employment in astronomy, industry and society worldwide. Through our work, we also seek to engage the public with the wonders of the universe and share the scientific, technological, cultural and educational aspects of astronomy with society.

Physics of the universe

Research at Leiden Observatory is organised in two broad themes: Galaxies and the structures in which they are embedded and Exoplanets, star and planet formation. Our research covers the fundamental physics of the origin and evolution of the large scale structures and galaxies in the universe as well as the origin of stars and their planetary systems. Questions we study include: what is the true nature of dark matter and dark energy, and is Earth the only habitable planet in our universe?

Research

Galaxies and the structures in which they are embedded

Researchers at Leiden Observatory study the fundamental physics - the basic properties, materials and forces that create structure in the Universe. Which processes collect matter into galaxies and gas into stars? With the use of powerful telescopes and advanced calculations and computer simulations, the astronomers seek to understand the origin, structure and evolution of galaxies in general, and the Milky Way in particular. Through these structures they try to uncover the unknown physics of dark matter and dark energy that takes up 95% of the Universe.

[Read more]

Exoplanets, and the formation of stars and planets

At Leiden Observatory, researchers investigate the origin of stars and their planetary systems. They detect and characterize planets around other stars (exoplanets) and study how stars and planets form, for instance by following molecules from interstellar clouds to nascent planetary systems. In this way they address questions about the origin of life and the possibilities of life existing on other planets than Earth. In other words, is Earth unique?

[Read more]

NOVA

NOVA, the Netherlands Research School for Astronomy, coordinates and stimulates astronomical research in the Netherlands. See the NOVA website for more information. The astronomical institutes at the universities of Amsterdam, Groningen, Leiden and Nijmegen together form NOVA.

The institute houses a number of facilities which support these themes